Hong Kong protests: school students form human chain in Tsuen Wan district to push for five key demands

Hong Kong protests: school students form human chain in Tsuen Wan district to push for five key demands

Teen participants hoped to put pressure on the government with peaceful demonstration

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Hong Kong students form a human chain to protest against the government and push for the five keys demands.
Photo: Nicola Chan/SCMP

More than 100 students from 12 secondary schools in Tsuen Wan formed a human chain this evening, to protest against the government’s inaction towards the remaining four demands. 

Participants include students from Po Leung Kuk Lee Shing Pik College, Yan Chai Hospital Lim Por Yen Secondary School, Po On Commercial Association Wong Siu Ching Secondary School and PLK Yao Ling Sun College. 

At about 5pm, students began to gather on the walkway outside exit A of Tsuen Wan MTR station. They began to form the human chain at 6pm, which stretched from the entrance of Discovery Park Mall to Liu Po Shan Memorial College. 

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A 16-year-old student, who only gave her surname as Lee, said that she started to participate in the movement in mid-August, and regrets not taking part sooner. 

“Because of family concerns for my safety, I didn’t join [the demonstrations] earlier,” says Lee. “Eventually I could not hold it in any longer, because remaining silent is like being complicit to the chaotic situation in Hong Kong.”

Lee said that she felt that Hong Kong was under pressure from the mainland.

“I fear that the culture and the education system in Hong Kong will be affected,” she says. “For example, we might all eventually be taught in Putonghua rather than Cantonese.” 

Students stand in front of a Lennon Wall near Tsuen Wan MTR station.
Photo: Rhea Mogul/SCMP

Some students held signs with slogans advocating freedom. Most students were dressed in their school uniforms, while some wore tear gas masks, and some covered their right eye in reference to the woman who was allegedly shot by a police bean bag round on August 11 in Tsim Sha Tsui. 

Students were chanting slogans such as: “Liberate Hong Kong! Revolution of out time!”, “Hong Kong police know the law but break it!” and “Five demands, not one less!”

Students sang Glory to Hong Kong, the new protest “anthem”, multiple times during the course of their demostration.

A female volunteer distributed handmade bookmarks, with the words: “Hong Kong” written in Chinese, to the students. She said she had made 1,000 bookmarks over the past two months. 

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Students also added notes to a Lennon Wall on a nearby walkway, and sprayed it with glue. They said that they were spraying it over fear that it will be removed during tomorrow’s CleanHK event, organised by pro-Beijing lawmaker Junius Ho Kwan-yiu. 

A 16-year-old student, named Yun, from Po On Commercial Association Wong Siu Ching Secondary School said that he was here for his own future, and Hong Kong’s future. 

“The situation in Hong Kong is getting worse,” he says. “People from my generation will be affected really badly and will have to work really hard in the future.” 

Yun added that he hopes the government will send representatives to speak with the protesters, and that they will  find a way to resolve the problem together. 

“I hope the resolution will involve the least sacrifice,” he says. “I hope the protests will end soon. Otherwise, it might escalate and cause serious casualties in Hong Kong.” 

“The human chain might have very little effect, but at least our voices will be heard by an international audience,” adds Lee. “They will see that even teenagers are speaking up.”

Edited by Jamie Lam

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