Super typhoon Mangkhut expected to hit HK this weekend, HKO warns of possible T8

Super typhoon Mangkhut expected to hit HK this weekend, HKO warns of possible T8

The HK Observatory has hoisted Typhoon signal No 1, but a more worrying potential threat closely follows

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Because Hong Kong is in the South China Sea, El Nino might bring more rain to the city, but the climate remains moderate.
Photo: Winson Wong/SCMP

While the typhoon signal may reach 3 today, this is not the typhoon to worry about. The current typhoon affecting Hong Kong, Barijat, is likely to bring squalls and showers but will still keep its distance from the city, said the weather office.

Meanwhile, right behind Barijat is Mangkhut, a super typhoon that is expected to move across the western north Pacific and get even stronger over the next few days. According to the latest data from the weather office, Mangkhut appears to be heading towards Hong Kong, but that could change. The office has warned that the heavy rain expected from Manghut along with the storm surge will pose a threat to the region.

This means Sunday is going to be cloudy with heavy rain and some thunderstorms. The wind could reach a Force 8 gale. But before Mangkhut barrels in to Hong Kong we will get a few days of warm weather, so looks like all the beach parties should happen on Saturday.

13 thoughts everyone has when the Observatory predicts a typhoon will hit Hong Kong

Meanwhile, the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) says that by the end of this year we will be experiencing an El Nino weather pattern, which might make Hong Kong even wetter.

During an El Nino weather pattern the oceans in some parts of the world become warmer than usual, which influences the weather, causing heavy rain, floods and even drought. These effects are made even worse by climate change, says the WMO’s Secretary-General Petteri Taalas.

Because Hong Kong is in the South China Sea, El Nino might bring more rain to Hong Kong, but the effects on the city’s climate remains moderate, according to Sham Fu-cheung, Chief Experimental Officer of the Hong Kong Observatory.

“The seawater temperature is still normal at the moment, but as Autumn approaches we expect to see an increase. We also observe that temperature of the Pacific Ocean surface is on a continuous trend to rise,” said Sham.

Edited by Nicole Moraleda 

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Super typhoon on its way

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