HKDSE 2018: Sibling candidates with brittle bone disease says HK government should be doing more for students with disabilities

HKDSE 2018: Sibling candidates with brittle bone disease says HK government should be doing more for students with disabilities

Cho Mei-yi and Cho Wai-long say they would like more support for students with special needs

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Siblings Cho Wai-long (left) and Cho Mei-yi sat the HKDSE exams this year.
Photo: Nicola Chan/SCMP

Cho Mei-yi, 20, and her brother Cho Wai-long, 18, are DSE candidates who were born with brittle bone disease.

Wai-long scored 19 in his best five subjects and hopes he'll be admitted at The Chinese University of Hong Kong to study economics. Mei-yi, who declined to reveal her results, plans to work in art or design.

To prepare for the DSE exams, the siblings from SAHK Jockey Club Elaine Field School have spent six to seven hours on revision per day since February. They had to take a break every two or three hours to prevent back pain from building up.

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Because of their conditions, they have experienced several bone fractures throughout their lives. During their most serious incidents, Mei-yi and Wai-long had to take entire semesters off school.

Mei-yi and Wai-long said that the government should provide more support to students with special needs by providing subsidies for rehabilitation devices.

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"The government should sponsor [students with physical disabilities with] wheelchairs," said Wai-long.

Mei-yi agreed and added that both manual and electric wheelchairs are "expensive," and cost upwards of HK$20,000.

Their class teacher Yuen Chee-bun complimented the siblings on their perseverance. He added that they are self-demanding, and see themselves as no different from other people.

Edited by Jamie Lam

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