Your grades and awards are not your identity

Your grades and awards are not your identity

I had a fairly typical upbringing. Both my parents worked full-time, and I didn’t have a lot of opportunities to spend time with them

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Many local students are forced by their parents to do extra curricular activities they are not interested in.
Photo: Lau Kwan-leong

I had a fairly typical upbringing. Both my parents worked full-time, and I didn’t have a lot of opportunities to spend time with them.

At times it got a bit lonely, and I often wished they could be around more. However, this gave me extra time and freedom to explore and discover new hobbies and interests.

When I entered secondary school, I knew exactly what I was interested in and had a clear sense of direction. Whereas many of my classmates didn’t have a clue what they wanted.

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As it turns out, it is quite common for Hong Kong students to not know what their true passion is. A lot of local parents want their kids to study in elite schools, and force their children to take up all kinds of extracurricular activities, whether or not they are interested in them. As a result, these kids lose sight of their true interests and passions.

This issue inspired me to create the video I submitted to the Unicef HK Make A Video competition. Nowadays, people are too focused on results. People only care about winning competitions and being the best at something. This is much like the protagonist of my video, who constantly emphasises his accomplishments, but neglects his own interests.

I want my video to encourage young people to build their own sense of self, and to explore and develop their strengths and interests.

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In addition, I hope it reminds parents to try to put themselves in their children’s shoes and consider their own interests, perhaps even ask them what they would like to do. I think it’s important for them to encourage their kids to be true to themselves, make their own decisions, and follow their own path.

I am who I am – I am a young person who has dreams and goals.


Unicef HK’s Make A Video competition gives young people a chance to express themselves. The project is co-organised by the Hong Kong Arts Centre’s IFVA, with support from Hang Seng Bank and Young Post. Check out the videos here. Email your feedback to edu@unicef.org.hk

The Make A Video Contest 2018 is now open for applications. This year, the theme is “The value we embrace”, which aims to encourage young people to embrace their values as they grow up. Details can be found here.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
You know yourself best

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