Hong Kong protests: Half of secondary students would take part in weekly Monday class boycott in support of anti-extradition demonstrations

Hong Kong protests: Half of secondary students would take part in weekly Monday class boycott in support of anti-extradition demonstrations

Other teens said they would join assemblies outside of school or wear ribbons in solidarity

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The Preparatory Platform of Class Boycotts in Secondary Schools said that about half of the surveyed secondary school students would participate in the class boycott on September 2.
Photo: Joanne Ma

Nearly half of Hong Kong secondary school students said they would take part in the weekly Monday class boycott set to begin on September 2, a survey has shown. The results of the survey – conducted by the Preparatory Platform of Class Boycotts in Secondary Schools – were released yesterday.

Among the 19,473 secondary school students who were interviewed from August 10 to 14, nearly 90 per cent of them supported the class boycott. The school strikes would be a show of support for the extradition bill protesters.

Police continue to ban protests in Hong Kong

While 48.9 per cent said they would boycott classes, 19.6 per cent said they would join different assemblies held outside class after school, and 31.4 per cent said they would opt for alternative methods, such as wearing ribbons at school to show their solidarity with the participants even though they cannot join the strike.

Regarding the frequency and duration of the class boycott, 46 per cent said they supported an “indefinite class boycott”. Yet, seeing that such a thing has never happened in Hong Kong, the Platform recommended the boycott to take place once a week for now.

The Platform – co-founded by student groups Demosisto, Demovanile and Anti-Foo – said that it would be held every Monday.

A timeline of events related to the extradition bill protests

Many students said they would support an indefinite class boycott.
Photo: SCMP graphics

Forty-six per cent of the interviewees said they would not consider whether the assemblies received a “Letter of No Objection” from the police, while 41.8 per cent said the letter might affect their decision. The rest saw the letter as a very important factor that could prevent them from attending the assemblies.

The Platform said that they would pick three venues on Hong Kong Island, and in Kowloon and the New Territories, for the mass gatherings during school time. Meanwhile, they also expected different concern groups from different schools to organise assemblies on campus.

The Platform had not confirmed the exact locations and timing of the gatherings at the time of going to press last Friday.

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