Camila Cabello's self-titled solo album proves she's no threat to her former Fifth Harmony bandmates [Review]

Camila Cabello's self-titled solo album proves she's no threat to her former Fifth Harmony bandmates [Review]

A year after her controversial departure from pop megastars Fifth Harmony, Camila Cabello has released her debut solo album, Camila. It really doesn’t live up to the hype.

Opener Never Be The Same starts things with moody synth notes, and metallic percussive sounds, but the promising start quickly subsides with Cabello’s monotone vocal delivery, and a generic dub-pop chorus.

The stripped-back All These Years suits Cabello’s voice far better, with a smooth soul guitar groove and close harmonies. Real Friends is similar, but with lyrics like, “Why do I even try, give me a reason why,” the song is predictable and void of personality.


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Piano ballad Consequences is far more natural sounding, while closers In The Dark and Into It showcase a dreamy electronica as Cabello finally finds her sound; but sadly it’s too little, too late.

The album really falls flat with She Loves Control and Havana, with both trying to capture a Latin vibe that seems forced.

Sorry to bear bad news, Fifth Harmony fans, but this album is as unimaginative as its name.

Edited by Karly Cox

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