Boy's special treatment highlights double standards

Boy's special treatment highlights double standards

china_hong_kong_illegal_immigrant_protest_hgk05_001.jpg

A protester holds a placard showing a picture of Siu Yau-Wai, 12, who was brought to attention recently for being in Hong Kong ilegally.
A protester holds a placard showing a picture of Siu Yau-Wai, 12, who was brought to attention recently for being in Hong Kong ilegally.
Photo: EPA

Two weeks ago the group Unison, which exposes racism, released findings that showed many kindergartens either rejected so-called ethnic minority children or shut them out by providing vital information only in Chinese.

Was there a public outcry? No. Secretary for Education Eddie Ng Hak-kim said nothing, nor did legislators, including those who would make a big show of fighting for equality. 

The Equal Opportunities Commission kept its characteristic silence. Last week it emerged that a 12-year-old mainland boy had been living illegally in the city for nine years with his grandmother, who used fake documents to get him here after his parents abandoned him. Legislator Chan Yuen-han publicised the case to gain support for the boy. The Immigration Department instantly issued him temporary papers. Ng expressed sympathy.

A school appraised him for a place. Ethnic minority children must be wondering why no one cares about the injustices they face even though they are born locally, while a mainland child who is residing illegally gets Rolls-Royce treatment. Public Eye does not begrudge the boy getting help. We are just pointing out the reality of one city, two standards.

 

Comments

To post comments please
register or