Talking points: Do you think government bus tours to promote political reform will make a difference?

Talking points: Do you think government bus tours to promote political reform will make a difference?

Hate it when you can't talk back? Well, you can with Young Post. Have your say and share with students around Hong Kong.

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Chief Secretary Carrie Lam (L) on an open top bus during a promotional tour.
Chief Secretary Carrie Lam (L) on an open top bus during a promotional tour.
Photo: Reuters

Shirley Tsang, 20, University of Toronto

If the objective of the bus tour is to build public support for the political reform package, I do not think it is working. The politicians barely made contact with local residents, so it's not as if the "show" gave Hong Kong residents extra extra information about the reform. It's no surprise then, that it's not getting passionate support.

The worst part is that the distance created between the touring politicians and local residents may create the sense that the government is not really listening or willing to communicate with the people to resolve any confusion about the reform. So I guess the bus tour is making a difference: a bad one.


Leuven Wang, 13, King George V School

Government officials must maintain close relationships with the public to promote better understanding of the law and political developments. The fact that they are willingly taking the time to reach out is a clear sign that they care about what the people think.

The idea of going on bus tours to interact with Hong Kong citizens will make these citizens realise that government officials aren't faceless entities behind masks, but men and women with moral values just like their own. This will raise support for government proposals.


Timophy Pit Hok-yau, 15, King Ling College

We all know the officials did not get up close and personal with citizens while standing on their buses. The media attention that the tour attracted was meant to help the government promote its political stance. However some citizens might not be impressed with the way the officials "reached out", so might choose not to support the political reform.


Charlotte Chong Hoi-kwo, 17, CCC Mong Man Wai College

The tour won't make a difference. The government officials are naive to believe that it will. First, it is impossible for the public to hear what is being promoted because of loud protestors. Secondly, most citizens have their own unflinching stance on whether to support it or not, anyway.

If the government really wants citizens' support, they should give them what they want: an election without political screening.


Ernest Leung Lok-hang, 15, La Salle College

It's a resounding "no" from me. Given what we have seen from citizens recently - from yelling at pan-democrats for barricading the road to democracy, to shouting at government officials that their wives should not be chosen by the Central government - it is quite evident that the political spectrum of Hong Kong is severely polarised.

There is simply nothing the government can actually do to lessen the gap between the two camps of people - not even threatening to withhold universal suffrage will work, so of course bus tours won't. The Central government has made its stance very clear; take it or leave it. All that is left is for Hongkongers is to decide whether or not to take it. The bus tours are just political shows and are pretty much meaningless.


Tell us what do you think of government bus tours to promote political reform in the comment box below.

In our next Talking Points, we'll discuss:

What are your thoughts on songs that insult the police at university concerts? Should they be allowed?

We are now accepting answers from readers for this new topic. To take part, e-mail your answer with your name, age and school, plus a high-res photo of yourself (no less than 1MB), to yp@scmp.com by Monday lunchtime next week.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Do you think government bus tours to promote political reform will make a difference?

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