Talking points: Will building malls at the border help to reduce the number of parallel traders?

Talking points: Will building malls at the border help to reduce the number of parallel traders?

Hate it when you can't talk back? Well, you can with Young Post. Have your say and share with students around Hong Kong

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Tuen Mun is one of the areas mainland tourists frequent.
Tuen Mun is one of the areas mainland tourists frequent.
Photo: K.Y. Cheng/SCMP

Ming Lee, 15, Law Ting Pong Secondary School

I do not think building shopping malls at the border will help to reduce the number of parallel traders. This won't reduce the frequency or the number of mainlanders coming to Hong Kong. In fact, they will be encouraged to visit the city since designated shopping malls will be filled with the products they want. They would then be able to buy these goods easily - in bulk - as everything would be available in one place. If the government really wants to do something about the situation, it should consider imposing taxes on parallel traders to discourage them from coming to Hong Kong.


Amos Cheung Man-ching, 17, Law Ting Pong Secondary School

Many Hongkongers believe that building shopping malls at the border could help to reduce the number of parallel traders. But I don't think it will. At first, the parallel traders will flock to the new malls, but at some point, the price of goods at the malls will go up - this is a very simple economic theory. Once that happens, the parallel traders will return to the urban areas, causing a nuisance for the locals again.


Talking Points: Do mainland tourists behave differently than visitors from other parts of the world?


Leuven Wang, 13, King George V School

This idea might reduce the number of parallel traders in the northern districts of Hong Kong, but the total number of mainlanders might increase as the shopping malls will be an attraction. At the same time, while it will probably be less disturbing to people and cause less physical havoc, the plan is unlikely to make daily necessities any cheaper for locals.


Joy Pamnani, 16, PLK Ngan Po Ling College

To be honest, I think building more shopping malls at the border is just a short-term solution, and would actually end up attracting more parallel traders. Yes, we could increase the supply of goods for everyone; but at the same time, by catering to these traders' needs, we are saying we support parallel trading and will just end up welcoming even more parallel traders to Hong Kong.

In the long term, I really think the government should look at working with mainland authorities to provide such goods across the border to ease demand from parallel traders and ensure locals have access to daily necessities.


May Huang, 18, Chinese International School

Parallel traders come to Hong Kong not only to shop, but also to venture into the more exciting and lucrative heart of the city. I do not think shopping malls at the border will greatly reduce the number of parallel traders who come to the city.


Tell us whether you think building malls at the border help to reduce the number of parallel traders in the comment box below.

In our next Talking Points, we'll discuss:

Last year, 6,595 girls and 5,900 boys were admitted to government-funded universities through Jupas. Do you think the DSE favour girls?


We are now accepting answers from readers for this new topic. To take part, e-mail your answer with your name, age and school, plus a high-res photo of yourself (no less than 1MB), to yp@scmp.com by Monday lunchtime next week.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Will building malls at the border help to reduce the number of parallel traders?

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