Talking points: Should the government broadcast adverts urging the public to support political reform?

Talking points: Should the government broadcast adverts urging the public to support political reform?

Hate it when you can't talk back? Well, you can with Young Post. Have your say and share with students around Hong Kong.

Amber Pang Tsz-ying, 16, Ma On Shan Tsung Tsin Secondary School

The advert reminds me of an old Chinese saying: "The government is free to burn down houses while the common people are forbidden even to light lamps."

The government is broadcasting adverts urging the public to support political reform, but when Hong Kong citizens raised banners requesting genuine universal suffrage, they ended up being arrested.

What the government is doing is brainwashing the public. It is using an authoritarian approach to make people accept political reform.


Titus To Cheuk-lam , 16, Ma On Shan Tsung Tsin Secondary School

I feel uncomfortable when I watch the adverts because I think the government is trying to trick people into supporting "fake universal suffrage".

To make things worse, Hong Kong citizens don't have a choice - the candidate for chief executive must win the support of a nominating committee chosen by the central government, and not the Hong Kong people. The public will not want to vote.


Frank Lee Chun-hei, 15, Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

Ads or no ads, Hong Kong people need to understand that our political reform should be developed steadily after the umbrella movement. Rushing into things is a bad idea.

It's time for us to trust in the Hong Kong government and let them find a balance between the demands of the central government and of Hong Kong citizens.


Anushka Purohit, 15 , Renaissance College Hong Kong

The government-broadcast adverts urging the public to support political reform are a form of propaganda.

Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, no matter what it is about, from politics to education, or even food. The fact that the government is trying to control the opinions of citizens instead of listening to them is bizarre, if not plain wrong.

Moreover it is very expensive to advertise; they're wasting public money.


Tinaz Mirza, 16, South Island School

Adverts are inherently biased. Their purpose is not to educate people and lead them to make the best decision, but rather to selectively present information to sway readers to a particular perspective.

I don't believe that the government's job is to sway the public in directions which benefit the government. The government should not advertise to gain support for their political reform.


Tell us whether you think the government should broadcast adverts urging the public to support political reform in the comment box below.

In our next Talking Points, we'll discuss:

What do you think of mainland tourists? Do they behave differently to visitors from other parts of the world?

We are now accepting your answers for this new topic. To take part, e-mail your answer with your name, age and school name, plus a high-res photo of yourself (no less than 1MB), to yp@scmp.com by Monday lunchtime next week.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Should the government broadcast adverts urging the public to support political reform?

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2 Comments

Shiu Chung Hei

23:43pm

Mainland tourists behave very differently to visitors from other countries. When asking for direction, a Japanese tourist shows his kindness. You can feel a friendly attitude from a British tourist.

However, mainland visitors are always rude. They jump the line, talk loudly and even block the street with their suitcases.

Many of them come to Hong Kong for buying daily necessities. It does help the economic growth of Hong Kong. Nevertheless, it may push up prices of the goods and cause shortage of certain products like powered milk.