Talking Points: if you had a food truck in Hong Kong, what kind of food would you serve?

Talking Points: if you had a food truck in Hong Kong, what kind of food would you serve?

Hate it when you can’t talk back? Well, you can with Young Post. Have your say and share with students around Hong Kong

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What would you sell?
Photo: Jonathan Wong/SCMP

We often get a lot of responses for our Talking Points questions, but this week we had even more than usual - you guys clearly love your food!

Arthur Fan, 15, Kwok Tak Seng Catholic Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would serve dumplings, fish balls, squid, noodles, and stir-fried chestnuts. A food truck is just an oversized, hygienic and legal version of the hawkers, so these foods would easily sell because everyone is used to them, and they could be sure that the snacks are safe and healthy.

I would park my truck at the intersection of Nathan Road and Argyle Street, as it one of the busiest areas in Hong Kong. It is also just two streets away from Ladies’ Market. I just hope that my truck would not be set on fire if there is another “fishball riot”.


Tsang Ho-yin, 11, St Francis of Assisi’s English Primary School

If I were to have a food truck, I would serve ice-cream waffles to all the shoppers in in Tsim Sha Tsui. Waffles have been sold in Hong Kong for a long time, and they are very popular here. Customers could choose their favourite flavour of ice cream to put on top and in between the waffles, making them even more delicious.


Where to tuck in at a Hong Kong truck stop


Carmen Cheung, 15, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve traditional Japanese food, such as okonomiyaki, yakitori and soba. Okonomiyaki is a yummy pancake, yakitori is some grilled meat on a skewer, and soba is the buckwheat noodle in soup.

I would park my truck in Sham Shui Po. It’s an area with a lot of people and a lot of local Hong Kong food, so Japanese food would stand out from the rest.


Tiffany Lim, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would probably park it somewhere crowded like Mong Kok so I can make most of my business. I would serve Italian food, because who doesn’t like pizza and pasta? Another reason why I’d choose this is because I could munch while I’m working. You can’t blame me since I’m human and I’m a pizza lover. Also, you can’t fire me since I’m my own boss.


Saba Iftkhar, 16, St Margaret’s Girls’ College, Hong Kong

If I had a food truck, I’d serve snacks and meals from India and Pakistan. South-Asian restaurants are a hit with people of all races, countries and colour, but they can be hard to find in Hong Kong because these businesses are usually small-scale and hard to spot. I’d park my food truck in the New Territories because there is already a lot of South-Asian cuisine in Kowloon, but it is more rare here. Plus, the cost would be way cheaper, too!


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Ada Lee, 12, Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

I’d sell dessert like pancakes, frozen yoghurt, or waffles. These foods are popular with both adults and children – and I like them, too – so there might be a long queue at my food truck. I’d park it in Central, at AIA because it is always full of people. When they get tired from playing they could buy food from my truck!


Michael Kwok Pui-hin, 15, Law Ting Pong Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would serve dim sum. Usually people need to go to cha lous (Chinese restaurants) if they want dim sum, but I’d park my food truck in Central so busy workers could enjoy the food. It’s also a great way to attract tourists and promote the food culture of Hong Kong.


Prudence Mak, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would sell desserts such as shaved ice, baked Alaska, smoothies, and ice cream. They are my favourite desserts and I would like to share them with others.

I would park it near Repulse Bay during summer, when lots of people go to the beach. Then in the winter, when there are fewer people, I would movie it to Tsim Sha Tsui because it is a tourist spot.


Kathy Cheuk Ka-yee, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve food that represents Hong Kong – with a touch of creativity: new-style egg puffs with ice cream toppings. These are a hybrid of traditional and modern cuisines. It would have the traditional taste of Hong Kong street food, but the ice cream toppings gives it a new form.

I would park the food truck somewhere crowded, such as Mong Kok, and my new-style egg puffs could satisfy those who are tired after shopping and are looking for something sweet and cool.


Letters from the Dorm: Chinese food gets lost in translation


Ruby Ng, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would park my food truck beside the airport and serve delicious local food items such as egg waffle and egg tart. Millions of tourists arrive Hong Kong, and all of them could enjoy the amazing local flavours from my truck!


Ella Chan, 16, Fung Kai Liu Man Shek Tong Secondary School

I would sell egg tarts, because they are a special part of Hong Kong’s culture that you cannot find anywhere else. And l would park next to Ocean Park because there are many visitors there everyday.


Vivian Lee Wing-yan, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would serve street snacks such as egg waffles, fish balls, and egg tarts, because they represent local Hong Kong local food and they are delicious.


Heidi Law Mei Lok, 15, Our Lady of The Rosary College

I would serve modern cuisine in Sham Shui Po. It’s better there than in Mong Kok because it is more convenient. My food would attract locals and tourists alike, because the food would be a harmonious combination of Chinese and Western elements.


Ivan Lo, 12, Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

I would sell organic salads made with locally produced seasonal vegetables so I could support our local farmers in Hong Kong. I would locate it in Central where many office workers are very busy and so salads would be perfect for a quick lunch. Salads are convenient, healthy, and fresh, exactly what people want nowadays. It would be very manageable and efficient to be make them on a food truck, so it’s a possible business plan for me.


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Jade Herndon, 16, Kwok Tak Seng Catholic Secondary School

I would serve American street-food like nachos, hot-dogs and of course, French fries with cheese and meat sauce. This type of food is easy to make in large quantities and it is absolutely DELICIOUS! I would park my food truck near Central or Tsim Sha Tsui because that’s where foreigners tend to be active.


Grace Chow, 15, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve roasted chestnuts, since there are fewer and fewer shops where you can find these snacks nowadays. And I would park my truck near the Tsim Sha Tsui Art Square, because it is one of the most crowded areas in Hong Kong.


Isaac Pang, 12 , Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

I’d sell hamburgers and French fries, and I’d make the price much lower than the fast food shops in Central.


Lee Wing-yan, 14, Tak Nga Secondary School

I‘d park my food truck in Tsim Sha Tsui and sell hot dogs to all the rich people shopping there. I love eating hot dogs and they are very easy to make.


Ho Bik-yu, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve egg waffles, because they are one of Hong Kong’s iconic street foods, and many tourists try egg waffles when they come to Hong Kong. Nowadays, they come in different flavours.


Bobo Cheung Hok-yu,15, Ma On Shan Tsung Tsin Secondary School

Food trucks should sell foods that represent Hong Kong’s unique street food culture, so I would serve egg puffs. First, there are different flavours, such as chocolate and strawberry. Second, they are easy to make, so it can be made fresh after the customers have ordered. Third, one serving of egg puffs is big enough for people to share. Share food, share joy.

I would park the food truck in Shatin as there are not enough street food stalls there. Then, more people would know about this delicious food.


Vivian Chan, 12, Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

I would sell cherry tomato tarts at Tsim Sha Tsui, because this kind of food only sells in the UK, but Hongkongers would also enjoy it! As soon as you smell it, you can’t control yourself to try it.


Kitty Lee, 13 , Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

I would serve local snacks. Food carts are an old Hong Kong tradition, so if I sold local snacks, many people would be reminded of their childhood. I would park my food truck on Sai Yeung Choi Street in Mong Kok, because there’s always a lot of entertainment there, so people can watch the show while eating snacks from my food truck and enjoy more fun in Hong Kong.


Kelly Ho, 14, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would park in Mong Kok, because there are many people and travellers there who would like to eat Hong Kong food like fish balls and siu mai. I would choose these dishes because they are part of our culture, and because they are cheap and easy to serve.


Lily Chan Ka-wai, 15, Fung Kai Liu Man Shek Tong Secondary School

I would serve egg puffs, so travellers can learn about Hong Kong food culture. I would park in Causeway Bay because it’s a popular spot for tourists.


Kary Cheung, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would sell snacks from different countries and travel to different schools to sell them to students. As Hong Kong is an international city with curious students, I think they would like to try food from around the world. I would sell things like churros from Spain and kimchi pancakes from Korea.


Miki Fung Mei-ki, 19, Our Lady of the Rosary College

If I had a food truck, I would serve fishballs. Hongkongers love to eat fishballs; they can be described as a food that is representative of Hong Kong. I would park my food truck in Tsim Sha Tsui. From what I know, there isn’t much street food in Tsim Sha Tsui, but a lot of tourists go shopping there. Serving fishballs in Tsim Sha Tsui would let tourists find out more about Hong Kong food culture, and would also let them have a snack after shopping. They’re very cheap and tasty, too!


Maggie Leung, 18, Our Lady of the Rosary College

If I had a food truck, I would serve desserts to my customers . The reason why I chose desserts was that dessert was my favorite food, and it would encourage me kept selling the food. For the parked place, since I was lazy and weak in sports, I would like to park it near my house--convenience first!


Joyce Yiu, 14, Tak Nga Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would like to serve some curry fishballs and egg tarts, because these are both foods that are local to Hong Kong and the tourist come to Hong Kong will try them. I would choose to park it at some tourist spots like Disneyland, Ocean Park or The Peak.


Yo Yo Ho Ching-man, 15, Law Ting Pong Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would serve egg waffles. Egg waffles are a part of the collective memory of Hongkongers and almost everyone enjoys eating them, even children.

I would park in Shum Shui Po, since egg waffles are not expensive, and Sham Shui Po is a poorer district so people wouldn’t be able to afford anything much more expensive than that.


Ada Lee Wing-yu,15, Our Lady of the Rosary College

If I had a food truck, I would serve traditional dim sum, for instance siu mai with quail egg. Nowadays, many Cantonese restaurants have already shut down. People struggle to find dim sum like they had in their childhood.

I would park my truck in Tsim Sha Tsui, because it’s a popular tourist spot. As many restaurants in Tsim Sha Tsui are quite expensive, my reasonable prices would attract a lot of customers.


Jimmy Chan, 13, HKUGA Secondary School

I would like to serve different flavour smoothies. Smoothies are suitable for all seasons. By having lots of different flavours, I would make sure there was something everyone liked. Although it is not a unique idea, it is cheap and delicious so it is a great choice, and I’d be confident that I’d have a lot of customers. I would park the truck at The Peak for a steady stream of customers.


Arzoo, 15, Tak Nga Secondary School

Well, If I had a food truck, I would serve everything from sweet to spicy, from hot to cold, from food to drink! Serving a variety of items would not only attract more customers, it would also improve my cooking skills.

I would serve spicy food like Korean noodles, or US steak. I would also like to sell cold drinks like they have in Starbucks, but for a cheaper price.

I would love to park my food truck in Tsim Sha Tsui because it’s always full of foreigners and locals, especially during rush hour.


Jade Luk, 15, Our Lady of the Rosary College

If I had a food truck, I would serve Korean food such as Korean rice rolls, hot and spicy rice cakes, fish cakes with soup and Korean fried chicken. Korean food is popular among Hong Kong teenagers and tourists nowadays. I think that selling Korean food in a food truck would attract more tourists to visit Hong Kong and more citizens to buy the snacks. In this two-year scheme, we could also promote Korean culture when we are selling the snacks.

I would park my food truck in Mong Kok. Mong Kok is full of different local food and is always crowded.


Candice Kok King-ching, 13, Tak Nga Secondary school

If I had a food truck, I would park it in Mong Kok and sell fried chicken and some drinks such as bubble tea.

Everyone goes to Mong Kok. If I put my food truck there, I reckon a lot of people would buy from it.

I would sell fried chicken and bubble tea because they’re not that common, but they are popular.


Wong Yeung Yi, 14, HKUGA College

If I had a food truck, I would serve traditional Hong Kong dishes like egg waffles, because I would like to tourists to get a taste of Hong Kong. I would park my truck outside Sogo in Causeway Bay because there are loads of tourists in that area.


Eunice Yung Po-yiu, 15, Fung Kai Liu Man Shek Tong Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would serve fishballs and dumplings because they are authentic Hong Kong foods. They’re also easy to make and popular amongst locals. I would park my truck in Mong Kok because it’s the home of a lot of authentic and delicious food.


Ada Cheung, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would park it in Mong Kok and sell western food, because there aren’t many western restaurants in that area. I would sell things like mashed potato, pizza, omelettes, etc. But I would keep it cheap. Each items would sell for between HK$10 and HK$30.


Angela Chow Hoi-chiu, 16, Fung Kai Liu Man Shek Tong Secondary School

I would serve fresh, peeled fruit in places with lots of tourists, such as MTR stations, or some tourist attractions. Traditional fruits used to be a very popular snack with Hongkongers, and I think it could be popular again.


Arthur Cho,13, HKUGA College

I would serve French toast with fruit or ice cream on top, because it is delicious. I would also try to make the price cheaper than the competition, and park at the Avenue of Stars, where tourists and locals alike could buy food from me.


Melody Lee Tsz-wai, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

If I had a food tuck, I would park at a shopping centre so I wouldn’t have to worry about other cars around me or bad weather. I would serve fish balls, chicken wings, and noodles, because they yummy, cheap, and traditional Hong Kong foods.


Jobie Wong, 12, Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

Most Hong Kong food trucks are selling junk food like hamburgers, French fries or even fried chicken, but what’s the point of that? You can buy that at McDonald’s or KFC. Instead I would serve tacos with healthy and tasty fillings. I’d park my food truck near the parks, because there are a lot of families in the area , and now parents could buy their children tasty, healthy tacos instead of ice cream or chips.


Eliz So, 13, HKUGA College

I would serve something that can fill your hungry tummy: pizza. It is delicious and it is popular with both students and adults.


Kris Lam Ka-wai, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve kanto cook, because in the winter a hot bowl of kanto cook can help warm you up. I would put different country’s fish cakes into the soup such as Hong Kong fishballs. I would park my truck at the foot of Tai Mo Shan, because it is colder than on the coast, and the climbers need lots of energy.


Tiffany Zhong, 14, Tak Nga Secondary School

If I had a food truck, I would park it at Golden Bauhinia Square and serve egg waffles to all the tourists so they could learn more about our culture.


Cheng Tsz-wai, 17, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve traditional Hong Kong foods such as curry fishballs, egg puffs and milk tea to all the tourists around Victoria Harbour.


Teresa Cai, 14, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would serve different flavours of egg waffle, as it is an original Hong Kong street snack. It is said to have originated in the 1950s, when supermarkets had a lot of broken eggs. People didn’t want to waste them, so they mixed it with flour and butter and poured the paste into a mould.


Holly Chan, 10, St Francis of Assisi’s English Primary School

I would serve traditional Hong Kong foods such as rice pudding and dim sum, because this would promote our unique traditional culture. I would park at famous tourist spots such as The Peak, Victoria Harbour and last but not least, Ocean Park. These well- known tourist spots are famous, so many people from different countries and cities can come and taste the delicious Hong Kong local food.


Cheng Hei-lam, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would serve some healthy food, and park at my school. It seems we always eat unhealthy, whether we have take-away or cup noodle or the school’s lunch box, and I want our schoolmate to eat more healthy food.


Jade Ng, 10, St Francis of Assisi English Primary School

I would serve Hong Kong cuisine, such as egg tarts, pineapple buns and milk tea, along with Chinese food like dim sum. Also, American food, such as hamburgers and French fries ... and maybe Japanese food, like sushi. I would park it at Tsim Sha Tsui as there are a lot of visitors there. As my food truck would have a wide range of food, I think it would get a lot of customers.


Karry Chu, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would park in Sak Kung and serve egg waffles, because that was ranked No.1 in a list of the 100 most popular Hong Kong street snacks.


Vivian Lau Siu-yee, 15, Fung Kai Liu Man Shek Tong Secondary School

I would sell pork buns near Sheung Shui station. First, it is near Shenzhen, and a lot of parallel traders pass by and they would like to have a nice snack. A lot of students go through there, too, so they could buy breakfast on the way to school, and lunch or tea on the way home.


Pauline Cheng, 15, Our Lady of Rosary

If I have a food truck, I want to sell some traditional food, such as sesame balls and maltose crackers in Tsim Sha Tsui. This is because my target is foreigners and anyone who wants to know more about Guangdong culture.


Joey Lam, 15, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve claypot rice with lap chang and cured duck leg. I would park at the Peak so tourists could enjoy the food with a nice view of Hong Kong.


Anka Wong,16,Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would park near the Clock Tower where many tourists visit, and serve dolly noodles because it is a delicious traditional local food and I’d like to show the world how distinctive it is.


Nicole Tam, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would sell local snacks like curry fish balls, shao mai, egg puffs, deep fried stinky tofu etc. I would park it next the school because when the student finish their lessons,they can buy something to eat.


Acumen Law Ying-lo, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve soup with fish maw and dried scallops. It is one of Hong Kong’s most famous street food, but it is disappearing. Therefore, I want to promote it to let more people to know it.


George Ng Kei-chun, 16, Fung Kai Liu Man Shek Tong Secondary School

I would choose some traditional and typical Hong Kong style’s food, such as wun tsai chi (Imitation shark fin soup), egg tarts, pineapple buns, dragon’s beard candy, etc. Out of all those, I think wun tsai chi is the best because it’s very quick and easy to prepare the materials and cook them.


Sharen Cheung, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would sell traditional Chinese pastry like red bean cake, chestnut cake and put chai ko. I would park it near the tourist spots because tourists only know about curry fish balls, egg puffs and egg waffle, and I want them to have a taste of our pastry.


Lau Shayne, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

If I have a food truck, I will park it in somewhere that is very crowed and has many tourists to visit, for example, Mong Kok, Causeway Bay, or Tsim Sha Tsui and I will sell homemade ice-cream! I will make many flavours, such as Belgian chocolate, mint chocolate chip, mango passion fruit, and more.


Miki Li Ka-ki, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve dragon’s beard candy and park near the Peak. Since the Peak is one of the most famous attractions in Hong Kong, lots of tourists visit here, and they could try this precious traditional food.


Candice Leung Tsz-ching, 15, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I’d serve milk tea, which was created by Americans during the second world war, and then made famous by Hongkongers. I’d also serve clay pot puddings, steamed barbecued pork bun, sweet heart cake, waffle, egg tarts and more, so tourists could enjoy eating our traditional local foods and spread love to our future generations.


Sandy Wong, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would park my food truck outside Hong Kong Disneyland! The food and drink inside the park is more expensive than in the rest of the city. Plus, there are many people going there to play every day, so business would be good. I would serve put chai ko because it’s a traditional snack that I never want to disappear!


Phoebe Ho Tung-yu , 17, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve traditional food from the 1960’s to 1980’s. For example it will include dragon’s beard candy, spring field pizza and ding ding candy. Those foods are disappearing in Hong Kong so that I want to remind the locals of them and introduce them to tourists. I think Victoria Harbour is the best place to park my truck because there are many tourists there.


Christal Li, 14, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would serve Korean fried chicken in Sham Shui Po. It is popular and delicious, and it tastes different from KFC. Although Sham Shui Po is a foodie paradise, most of the cuisine there is local snacks such as egg tarts, fish balls, egg waffles and so on, so Korean food would stand out.


Christina Chiu-ting, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

If I had a food truck, I would sell burgers with juicy beef and aromatic cheese in Mong Kok which is one of the famous shopping area in Hong Kong.


Chrissie Li, 18, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I wouldn’t serve food, I would serve different kinds of drinks such as Taiwanese drinks. When you are walking or feeling thirsty, you may want to drink something to keep going on. Taiwanese drinks are quite popular with teenagers, so I would park in Tsim Sha Tsui.


Cherie Chan, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I’d park my car at Tsim Sha Tsui and sell waffles. Waffles are my favourite sweets, you can put different toppings and sweet sauces on them, and you can make them with different batters, like chocolate and mango. I like to eat waffles with only sweet milk, peanut butter and strawberry sauce! I am sure everyone will have their own kind of waffles.

Many people go to Tsim Sha Tsui as it is a popular place for tourist and us. If I put my food truck there, many people will buy my yummy waffles!


Tracy Ho, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve spicy pork toasts and egg tarts with ice cream. Customers could choose the flavour of the ice cream and put it on the egg tarts. I would park at Ocean Park, which has a lot of visitors.


Bobo Yu Po-shan, 13, Tak Nga Secondary School

I would park near Mong Kok, as Mong Kok is a foodie paradise. I would serve fish balls because this is one of Hong Kong’s traditional foods, but I would make different flavours of fish balls, for example, curry fish ball, fish ball with light soy sauce, fish ball with ketchup, or even fish ball with ice cream.


Amanda Wong, 17, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve coffee and herbal tea at the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal. There are a lot of foreign tourists coming through the cruise terminal, so they might like to try traditional Hong Kong herbal tea.


Ng Pui-tak, 12, Shatin Tsung Tsin Secondary School

I’d serve local street food like fish balls, three stuffed treasures, and egg puffs. These foods represent special cuisine in Hong Kong, and they are very easy and fast to cook. We can park the food truck in Central because there are a lot of businesses and many workers who are too busy to eat lunch in a restaurant.


Kelly Wong Hoi-lam, 16, Our Lady of the Rosary College

I would serve local traditional snacks such as sweetheart cake and chicken biscuits, and I would park the truck outside the airport so people could have a great, memorable meal before they leave.


Leung Wing-shan, 16, Our Lady of Rosary College.

I would sell barbecued food such as beef, pork, squid and more, because this food is very popular in Hong Kong and suitable for tourists who don’t feel like going to a restaurant. I would also sell salad for customers who think the food is too greasy. I’d park the truck next to Kowloon Park in Tsim Sha Tsui, where many couples and family will have a picnic. They can enjoy the food while walking or sitting in the park.


In our next Talking Points, we’ll discuss: what’s the worst dish at your school canteen? What’s wrong with it? We are now accepting your answers for this topic. To take part, email your answer with your name, age, and school, along with a nice, clear selfie (make sure it’s not blurry), to yp@scmp.com by lunchtime on Monday. Don’t forget to include “Talking Points” in the subject line.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
If you had a food truck, what would you sell?

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neng euis

13:56pm