As Britain faces hottest June heatwave since 1976, a group of students protest school's uniform rules, and wear skirts

As Britain faces hottest June heatwave since 1976, a group of students protest school's uniform rules, and wear skirts

Britain’s hottest June since 1976 has gotten students heated up at a secondary school in Exeter, as boys wear skirts to school in protest of not being allowed to wear shorts during the hot weather.

Britain’s hottest June since 1976 has got students heated up at a secondary school in Exeter, in the south of England: and boys wore some unexpected outfits to school in protest against not being allowed to wear shorts during the hot weather.

As the temperature soared past 30 degree Celsius earlier this week, the teenage boys had asked their teachers if they could swap their long trousers for shorts. They were told no – shorts weren’t permitted in the school uniform policy. When they protested that the girls were allowed bare legs, the school – no doubt joking – said the boys were free to wear skirts too if they chose. 


 

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When the Isca Academy in Devon opened on Wednesday, a handful of boys took their teachers up on the suggestion. On Thursday morning, an estimated 30 boys arrived for lessons proudly wearing eye-catching, tartan-patterned skirts. 

Some had borrowed from girlfriends, others from sisters. A few had gone the extra mile and shaved their legs.

“Quite refreshing” was how one of the boys described the experience, while another said he enjoyed the “nice breeze” his skirt provided.

One boy said he was told his short skirt exposed too much hairy leg. Some of the boys stopped at a shop on their way to school to pick up razors to make sure they didn’t get on the wrong side of any beauty police.


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Headteacher Aimee Mitchell said the school was prepared to reconsider its dress policy.

“Shorts are not currently part of our uniform for boys and I would not want to make any changes without consulting both students and their families. However, with hotter weather becoming more normal, I would be happy to consider a change for the future” she added.

A spokesperson also added that none of the boys were punished for their acts of protest.

Claire Lambeth, the mother of one of the boys who began the protest, said she was proud of her son Ryan for challenging the school’s policy.

“The school is being silly really – this is exceptional weather. I was very proud of Ryan. I think it was a great idea” she said.

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