Occupy Central: Day three in full

Occupy Central: Day three in full

Yesterday started off pretty quietly with barricaded roads, little traffic and protester-numbers thinning as activists went home to clean up and possibly grab a bite. But as offices closed ahead of today’s National Day holiday, Hongkongers began to stream towards the protest hotspots.

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A demonstrator sits under an umbrella on Canton Road in Tsim Sha Tsui in Hong Kong on Wednesday.
A demonstrator sits under an umbrella on Canton Road in Tsim Sha Tsui in Hong Kong on Wednesday.
Photo: Bloomberg

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The sign says it all.
The sign says it all.
Photo: Agence France Presse

Yesterday started off pretty quietly with barricaded roads, little traffic and protester-numbers thinning as activists went home to clean up and possibly grab a bite. But as offices closed ahead of today’s National Day holiday, Hongkongers began to stream towards the protest hotspots.

Not even thunderstorms could dampen their enthusiasm, the iconic umbrella which had been used to fend of tear gas two days earlier were deployed against the elements. In some ways the turn in weather was a blessing as it cooled the sweltering heat.

Stay tuned on our InstagramFacebook and Twitter to get live updates on Occupy Central.

Timeline Sept 30

1 pm: Executive Council Convenor Lam Woon-kwong urges protestors to occupy places like Tamar park or Victoria Park to reduce the nuisance to the public.

11:30 am: Chan Kin-man meets with the press. He apologises for causing nuisance to the public and hope that they can understand Occupy Central aims to save the city.

8 am: Crowds wait expectantly around Bauhinia square, so do the police. The ceremony goes without a hitch, but people wonder why Hong Kong’s flag seems so small in the flypast. Joshua leads students in a silent protest. Counsellor Paul Zimmerman causes a stir . . . 

District Councillor Paul Zimmerman holding a yellow umbrella during the National Day Reception at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.
Photo: SCMP

7 am: Some protesters want to storm their way in to the official flag-raising ceremony, but officials let them in without a fight. Joshua Wong says a taxi driver gave him a lift to the ceremony. Long security checks to make sure the ceremony is safe.

6 am: Protesters start to gather near Bauhinia Square. Students urge them to remain peaceful.

5 am: Soaked democracy protesters regroup as Occupy Hong Kong passes the 100 hours mark.

4 am: All focus is on the National Day ceremony.

1 am: The amber rainstorm warning is issued.

Midnight: Protesters in Mongkok use police banners to issue their own warning.

11 pm: Another thunderstorm warning is issued.

10 pm: Two ambulances are spotted on Gloucester Road. There is a pillar of recycling in Admiralty that draws world attention. Volunteers spritz protesters with water to keep them cool at Admiralty. Occupy Central leaders tell of death threats they got before the protests. The British firm that sold tear gas to Hong Kong Police says it will review the sales. Ethnic minorities are doing their bit too. Britain says it will call in the Chinese ambassador over the Hong Kong protests – that’s not a good thing for the ambassador.

9 pm: The first tents are spotted. A Chinese TV news report says the protests have cost Hong Kong HK$40 billion. Yellow ribbons begin to appear at MTR stations. Students are handing them out in Kowloon Tong MTR. The streets are packed with protesters, waving lights. Students are unable to get to CausewayBay or Tamar and end up joining in Tsim Sha Tsui instead. A fire engine, siren blaring, is unable to pass the protests. Police say kilometres of HK roads are occupied and call on protesters to leave. Celebrities at home and abroad show their support. Shelters pop up against the rain.

8 pm: Urban Outfitters which was meant to open its Hong Kong branch today is firmly shut. The rain comes down the umbrellas go up and make for great photo ops. Once the rain stopped the every stylish Hongkongers held up their phones to light the way.

EPA

7 pm: Mongkok begins to fill up again. There is lightning which makes for dramatic protest pictures and the storm breaks. Prowling YP sub-editor Lucy Christie reports that there are lots of black t-shirts on the streets. 

There are demonstrations in support of Hong Kong protesters planned in New Zealand, Australia, Taiwan, Scotland, Germany, Britain, Norway, the US. After-work crowds begin to drift onto the streets. Here's on in Catalonia, Spain:

Photo: Associated Press

 

6 pm:  Hong Kong Observatory issues a thunderstorm warning for 7pm. International media are watching and say how amazed they are that HK’s protests are so polite. At government HQ, protesters raise a banner asking “Do you hear the people sing”. An angry man pelts protesters with rotten eggs. Protesters put up signs to tell people what supplies they need, including ice, first aid equipment and goggles.

5 pm: Roads are heavily barricaded by protesters who carry umbrellas, the symbol of the protest. A policeman asking protesters to clear a lane for cars is forced to leave after he is met with chants of  "No compromise". Protest organisers Alex Cho and Chan Kin-man repeat their demands for CY Leung to resign at a press conference outside government HQ in Admiralty. But students remind people that the reason for "their" protests was democracy and political reform, not to ask for anyone to resign. Occupy Central says it will open "humanitarian corridors" to let emergency vehicles through.

4pm: Yellow warning signs appear, citing the Nuremberg Principle IV, which says that if officials break international law they won’t be able to use the excuse that their boss told them to do it. Scholarism says they will hold a silent protest for democracy on National Day. Hong Kong’s police chief sends a message to his officers to "stay united and resolute". People are pouring into Admiralty, still nervous about being teargassed. Lines of police vans are parked near the PLA HQ building.

3pm: Protesters get creative, drawing pictures, decorating buses with messages of encouragement. A jewellery shop opens in Nathan Road in the middle of the protest.

2pm: South China Morning Post posts a picture of the PLA watching protests from their HQ. Police are still scarce on the streets. The SCMP and Young Post websites are blocked on the mainland. Crowds begin to thicken around Sogo. Yellow ribbons are spotted tied to the hand grips on the MTR. 

Stay tuned on our Instagram, Facebook and Twitter to get live updates on Occupy Central. And take a look at our photo galleries "Humans of Occupy Central" to see just who are some of the people on the streets.

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