Scholarism’s Joshua Wong supports class boycott for right to CE nomination

Scholarism’s Joshua Wong supports class boycott for right to CE nomination

Should students strike? Wong Yat-hei talks to Scholarism leader to find out about a potential class boycott over Beijing's Hong Kong policy

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Scholarism convenor Joshua Wong says he will join Occupy Central if it takes place.
Scholarism convenor Joshua Wong says he will join Occupy Central if it takes place.
Photo: Jonathan Wong/SCMP

Scholarism says more than 50 students have committed to boycotting classes, if the central government denies the city's right to civil nomination for chief executive.

Convenor of Scholarism, Joshua Wong Chi-fung, said the student group will support the call by the Hong Kong Federation of Students for a week-long class boycott early next month. "I am working on the time, location, and other details for the boycott. At the moment, the class boycott is for tertiary students but I won't rule out the possibility of getting secondary students involved," he said.

Joshua, 17, will study politics at the Open University of Hong Kong in the upcoming school term.

Joshua said he will definitely join Occupy Central if it takes place. "I plan to invite professors and teachers to talk to students during the demonstration. I think it is a great way for students to learn about civic education," he said.

Rai Arlin, a Form Six student from St Margaret's Girls' College, thinks that the class boycott shows that students care about society, and she plans to take part. "Students have limited power and voice in the world. Most consider us too immature to understand the happenings in politics. Skipping classes allows students to voice their opinion and show that they are well aware of the political situation in Hong Kong," she said. "Although my parents will not agree with me not going to class, I think students are mature enough to make their own decisions."

While some students are passionate about voicing their views, there are those who think it is unrealistic to join a class boycott.

"I believe 'tiger parents' in Hong Kong will never let their children strike," says Reece Chiu, a Form Five student from Li Po Chun United World College.

"Most of them would rather have their children take one more English class than fight for the right to nominate a chief executive candidate."

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Skiving as a statement

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