Hong Kong's most haunted places

Hong Kong's most haunted places

YP cadets Michelle Fasching and Hua Yuk-ting go ghost hunting in some of Hong Kong's spookiest spots

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Nam Koo Terrace glows ominously.
Nam Koo Terrace glows ominously.
Photo: Martin Williams/SCMP

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The Museum of Coastal Defence is eerily quiet.
The Museum of Coastal Defence is eerily quiet.
Photo: Edmond So/SCMP

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The Old Mental Hospital on High Street, Sai Ying Pun.
The Old Mental Hospital on High Street, Sai Ying Pun.
Photo: SCMP

Are you scared of the dark? If so, you might want to look away now.

Hong Kong's Taoist and Buddhist background means the city isn't short of ghost stories and haunted houses. To mark the end of the Hungry Ghost Festival, we took a spine-tingling tour of the city's most haunted hang-outs.

Mong Man Wai Building, CUHK

This bright yellow building, situated on a hillside at Chinese University, has been home to the biochemistry department since 1998.

There is a rumour that the building's second floor used to be a morgue, which provided bodies for science students to study. To this day, many students feel an eerie chill when they take the lift past the second floor.

"Sometimes, at night, the door opens to a blank wall, despite there being no button to press for the second floor," says Amy Tsang, a CUHK student.

Molly For, another CUHK student, says: "I heard a student once said the elevator door opened to reveal a corridor with people pushing carts around, like it was still a morgue."

Nam Koo Terrace

This haunted house is in Wan Chai. It is a two-storey house which was used by the Japanese during their occupation. Many women were tortured and killed there.

Those who visit the house have said they've heard the screams of tortured women, and even seen green fireballs floating about. According to Oriental Daily, in 2003 a group of teenagers stayed the night at the house, hoping to catch a glimpse of the ghosts. Three of the girls emerged panic-stricken, claiming to have been attacked by the spooky residents. Police sent the girls to hospital to receive psychiatric treatment. 

Just looking at the crumbling exterior in the moonlight is enough to send a shiver down your spine.

Museum of Coastal Defence

Located in Shau Kei Wan, the museum was used as a coastal defence fort during the Ming and Qing periods, as well as during British rule and the Japanese occupation.

With its long tunnels and isolated grounds, the museum gives off a seriously spooky vibe, even if you don't know the history.

It is said to be haunted by all those who have died in battle through the years.

The security guards that patrol the museum have also reported hearing women screaming, and seeing a woman with waist-length hair and only half a body.

Visitors have also claimed to have seen a mysterious woman wearing white walking around the museum.

High Street haunted house

Originally built in 1892 as a quarters for nursing staff, the High Street haunted house in Sai Ying Pun might just be the scariest place in the city.

It has a bloody history, and was rumoured to have been used as an execution hall by Japanese troops during the second world war.

After the war, it was used as a psychiatric hospital until two fires forced it to be abandoned in the 1970s. Since then people have been reporting ghostly sightings.

It's now the site of the Sai Ying Pun Community Complex, but there are still sightings of a mysterious, devil-like man dressed in traditional Chinese clothing who roams the building.

Tsung Tsai Yuen

Tsung Tsai Yuen in Tai Po used to be a popular picnic spot. That was before a tragic landslide killed 28 people in 1955.

It is believed that the dead still haunt the area.

One famous story involved a mini-bus driver who drove an empty bus through Tsung Tsai Yuen. An ashen-faced woman boarded and put some joss paper in the cash box.

The driver asked the woman to pay her fare, but she didn't respond. At the next stop, she whispered "thank you" and peacefully left the bus. Spooky!

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Be afraid, be very afraid

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