Sustainable what?

Sustainable what?

Although Hongkongers eat seafood regularly, most have no knowledge about eco-friendly supplies of the marine delicacies.

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Young people should be taught about saving animals, students say.
Young people should be taught about saving animals, students say.
Photo: Ricky Chung

While seafood is an important part of Chinese cuisine, 95 per cent of Hongkongers interviewed were not aware of what sustainable seafood is, according to a recent survey by Olympian City.

The survey interviewed 684 people last month. More than 35 per cent said they have seafood at least three times a week, while 33 per cent eat it every day. Only 4.3 per cent of them have a solid understanding of sustainable seafood.

"Sustainable seafood refers to seafood in industries that are very well regulated, and therefore have a low risk of endangering the specific kind of ocean creature," said Shadow Sin Ying-tung, assistant manager of scientific projects at the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation.

The Hong Kong WWF launched a seafood guide to encourage people to eat sustainable seafood in 2007; the guide has been updated regularly through the years.

The list now contains more than 70 popular seafood species that can easily be found in local markets.

The items are classified into three groups, "Green - Recommended", "Yellow - Think twice" and "Red - Avoid". Several kinds of tuna fish are classified as Red while salmon are classified as Yellow.

Justine Chan, 12, from Singapore International School, thinks that Hongkongers continue to eat endangered sea animals and their parts such as shark fin because they are not aware of WWF's colour-coded guide. "I believe it's important to educate people from a young age about helping to save animals," said Justine.

Gigi Wong, 19, from Po Leung Kuk Laws Foundation College, said she is concerned about sushi convenience stores across Hong Kong since the source of the seafood is unknown.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Sustainable what?

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