Chinese history syllabus for Hong Kong schools missing key events; will teachers have to pick up the slack?

Chinese history syllabus for Hong Kong schools missing key events; will teachers have to pick up the slack?

There is a worrying lack of certain historical events in the proposed curriculum that teachers will have to make up for, says legislator Ip Kin-yuen

kevin_ip_david_wong.jpg

Kevin Yeung (left) and Ip Kin-yuen have different opinions on how history should be taught.
Photo: David Wong/SCMP

There is a worrying lack of certain historical events in the proposed Chinese history curriculum that teachers will have to make up for, says legislator Ip Kin-yuen.

Ip, who represents the education functional constituency which includes all teachers in Hong Kong, added that while teachers have been given freedom in how to teach the subject, important events like the 1967 Leftist riots or the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown should be in the syllabus.

“To a certain extent, textbook authors and teachers will follow the syllabus, so while they can teach things outside the curriculum, it is better if the events are put in the syllabus itself,” the legislator told Young Post yesterday.


Students have mixed feelings about a compulsory Chinese history course


Meanwhile, Hong Kong’s education minister, Kevin Yeung Yun-hung, has urged against dwelling on “one or two events” in a meeting with lawmakers.

The meeting was held a day after the government launched a second public conference on the compulsory Chinese history subject for junior secondary students, to be implemented in 2020.

“We understand different events have different meanings to different people, but when we look at China’s 5,000 years of history, sometimes some events may be relatively less important from a historical and educational point of view,” Yeung said.

Ip disagrees, saying that history must be learned in full. Nevertheless, he believes that Hong Kong’s teachers will provide all the necessary information.

“I am confident that Hong Kong’s teachers will teach outside the syllabus to compensate for the slack.”

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Teachers pick up Government slack

Comments

To post comments please
register or