Documentary A Century of Power shows CLP's role in modernising infrastructure from colonial Hong Kong to the present

Documentary A Century of Power shows CLP's role in modernising infrastructure from colonial Hong Kong to the present

Electricity company China Light & Power founded by the Kadoorie family in 1901 played a vital role in the development of the city we call home

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A CLP cable being laid in Kowloon back in the 1950s.

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Lord Kadoorie, then Chairman of CLP, gives out electrical appliances to residents of Tap Mun when electricity was first supplied to outlying islands

Can you imagine living in a time when having access to electricity was a luxury?

One Jewish family – the Kadoories – and the electric company they founded have been in Hong Kong since then and have helped transform Hong Kong into the neon-lit city we know now.

A Century of Power, a short documentary film on how CLP (China Light & Power) has powered the growth of Hong Kong and provided electricity to millions of homes in the city since 1901, and how Hong Kong society has changed in the past century, was released on Monday.

The movie, produced by Elaine Forsgate Marden, a filmmaker known for the 2012 film Proverbs, was filmed over the past two years and features footage from the past to events in the present, including the construction site of the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge.


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In the movie, you can see Kowloon before skyscrapers, when electricity was first supplied to outlying islands, and a dazzling time-lapse of today’s iconic Hong Kong landscape.

Secondary school students from Kowloon Tong School, SKH Holy Trinity Church Secondary School and Pui Ching Middle School were invited to the premiere and the company has plans to bring the movie to more schools.

“It is Sir Michael Kadoorie’s [chairman of CLP Holdings] firm belief that it is through history that we understand and appreciate what we have today and he hopes every generation can learn from the past and cultivate a positive vision for the future through the sharing of history,” says Quince Chong Wai-yan, CLP’s Chief Corporate Development Officer.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Hong Kong then and now

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