Here's how Junior Police Call is using Hong Kong's longest zipline, laser tag, and 3D printing to promote social responsibility

Here's how Junior Police Call is using Hong Kong's longest zipline, laser tag, and 3D printing to promote social responsibility

A new Junior Police Call training camp wants to appeal to young people with features such a zipline and laser range

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Police want to encourage young people at the camp to be socially aware.
Photo: Nora Tam/SCMP

Young people taking part in a police scheme designed to encourage them to help fight crime will be able to try out the Hong Kong’s longest zipline at a new training camp which officially opened on Thursday.

Once a fire school, the newly renovated Junior Police Call training camp in Pat Heung in the New Territories features the 100-metre-long zipline for members.

“The training camp provides a platform for youth to communicate with police, thus promoting their sense of responsibility to society,” Police Superintendent Yau Kwok-keung said.


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Established in 1974, the Junior Police Call currently has more than 180,000 members, including over 4,000 from ethnic minorities. In 2016 the government asked the force to enhance Junior Police Call work; one measure was to set up the Junior Police Call Permanent Activity Centre and Integrated Youth Training Camp.

The centre builds discipline, physical strength and teamwork, as well as raise awareness of laws and discourage against crime. Camp organisers expect to train 20,000 people aged from nine to 25 every year.


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In addition to the zipline, the camp features a simulated laser range, a 3D print studio and a simulated crime scene to appeal to its young audience.

Shahryar Naeem, a 19-year-old Pakistani student from The University of Hong Kong, told Young Post on Friday that the scheme would encourage more diversity within the police force.

“The ethnic minorities on the scheme would learn more about how the police execute their duties” he said, “Setting up the training camp in Pat Heung is convenient for South Asians as a lot of people from Nepal and Pakistan live in Yuen Long”.

Edited by Charlotte Ames-Ettridge 

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Youth police camp has HK’s longest zipline

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