The time to act as climate change threatens to destroy more than half the planet is now

The time to act as climate change threatens to destroy more than half the planet is now

A fun new event uses art to illustrate the effects of human-caused climate change on our planet - and shows what we can do to make a difference

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In Chasing Ice, a scientist standing on the Greenland Ice Sheet puts things in perspective.
In Chasing Ice, a scientist standing on the Greenland Ice Sheet puts things in perspective.
Photo: Chasing Ice

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It's up to us to make this beauty last forever!
It's up to us to make this beauty last forever!
Photo: Chasing Ice

Scientists say that unless we act against climate change now, we will witness a rare mass extinction, losing more than half of the world's plant and animal species in the next 300 years.

For the past two years, the Emmy-award winning documentary Chasing Ice has been screened in 172 countries and on all seven continents. It has been stunning audiences with beautiful images of some of the world's biggest glaciers. These powerful pictures are also shocking - they show undeniable evidence of human-caused climate change and its impact on land and in the ocean.

This and next month at Ocean Art Walk 2015 at Stanley Plaza, artists and young people take Chasing Ice as their inspiration to encourage everyone to cherish our waters. Join us for a closer look at the land and water we all depend on for survival, and discover how climate change is impacting life on Earth and what could happen if we don't act now.

It's just as true in Hong Kong

Although melting glaciers might seem a world away from Hong Kong, local energy consumption plays a significant part in global warming - and the impacts of climate change affect all of us, everywhere.

Melting glaciers cause changes in sea temperatures and rising sea levels around the world. In Hong Kong, the impacts of these changes are already being seen in Mai Po wetland and local coral reefs.

What can you do to help?

We can all help to create a more aware and active society and reduce our collective environmental impact.

Dancers use the oceans for inspiration. Photo: Chasing Ice

 

Think about the energy you use:

  • Turn off the lights when you leave a room
  • Make your air conditioning 1 or 2 degrees warmer
  • Walk, take public transport, use the stairs

Think about the things you buy:

  • Buy locally produced food and products rather than items imported from overseas
  • Buy food and products that are sustainably grown or harvested

Think about the waste you create:

  • Use less plastic: ask for a ceramic mug when you order coffee or take your own refillable mug; think before you buy a drink in a plastic bottle or get a takeaway boxRecycle and reuse, and encourage your school, friends and family to join you!

 

Events

Exhibition

What: Bread Studio, Gareth Dunster, and Karen Pow use art to capture people's attention and inspire positive action.

When: March 28-April 19

Dance performances

What: Lindsey McAlister, Kirsten Ho and Anca Chung collaborate with 30 young talented dancers to create a series of performances inspired by our ocean.
When: March 28, 12pm, 2.30pm, 4pm; April 4 and 5, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm

Movie marathons

What: Free screenings of Chasing Ice and other local and international films about the world's oceans. Topics include global warming, sustainable fishing and ocean pollution.
When: April 3-5, 3.30pm-6pm

Nail art mural

What: Make a charitable donation and create art alongside professional artists to help protect our environment.
When: March 28, April 3-5, 1pm-6pm

Ocean quiz

What: Test your knowledge of our waters.
When: March 28 and April 3-5, 1pm-6pm

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Need to act as planet skates on thin ice

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