Jason shows parents why being a YouTuber isn't just a useless and worthless dream

Jason shows parents why being a YouTuber isn't just a useless and worthless dream

Teenagers need understanding from their family members, teachers and society, not criticism, says aspiring YouTuber

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Cheuk Chin-hao's video, Jason Go, is a combination of his name and his dream. The clip is about his dream of becoming a YouTuber and it shares a bit about his daily life.

My primary school classmates were the ones who first introduced me to YouTube. There are many kinds of videos on the site, and it shows that being a YouTuber can actually be an occupation. Although I hadn’t shot any videos before, it looked like it was enjoyable and free. So, to explore my interest in it, I took part in this Unicef video project.

In the five-day video camp, I learned a lot about video filming from everyone there. I found out that shooting a video is very interesting. At first, I was reluctant to do anything in front of the camera, but the instructors and teaching assistants reminded me not to be nervous. There is a first time for everything, and it might be good to start here since I would like to work in this field!


A happy home is the key to a beautiful life


I made a lot of improvements after taking part in the contest. It was a very memorable event, so now I also keep myself up-to-date with news and events of Unicef HK.

My video, entitled Jason Go, is a combination of my name and my dream. The clip is about my dream of becoming a YouTuber and it shares a bit of my daily life. I wish my parents could understand and support my dream after watching this clip. I hope they would understand why I want to become a YouTuber, instead of simply throwing cold water on me.

Many teenagers have their own dreams. What they need is understanding from their family members, teachers and society, not criticism or sarcastic remarks. So, I filmed this video, hoping to spread the message that everyone needs freedom. Parents should let their children do what they want.

Unicef HK’s “Make a Video” competition gives young people a chance to express themselves through video. The project is co-organised by Hong Kong Arts Centre’s IVFA, with support from Hang Seng Bank and Young Post. Check out the videos here, and you can email your feedback to edu@unicef.org.hk

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Watch me follow my dream

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3 Comments

elia jassy

14:38pm