More mainlanders who failed the class on potty training: the face palming continues

More mainlanders who failed the class on potty training: the face palming continues

toilet.jpg

The mother of the child said the toilets were too small for her, while a flight attendant found the child at the back of the cabin before the plane took off.
Photo: SCMP Pictures

Mainlanders are in the headlines again for their bad bathroom etiquette – namely, not using a bathroom at all.

The latest incident happened on Sunday, when parents of a young toddler allowed the child to poo on the floor of an plane about to take off from Nanjing.

The mother of the child said the toilets were too small for her, the child and another relative to get inside, the Shanghai Morning Post reported. Which at least finally gives us an answer to the age-old riddle of: “How many family members does it take for a toddler to drop a load?”

And no, this wasn’t some sudden emergency “when-you-gotta-go-you-gotta-go” situation. A passenger on the Shenzhen Airlines flight from Nanjing to Guangzhou said two lavatories on the aircraft were vacant at the time.

A flight attendant found the family in the midst of their stinky situation at the back of the cabin before the plane took off.

Meanwhile in Changsha, Hunan province, a teenage boy managed to shut down the lift in his apartment building for two days – because he peed on the buttons.

The wiring in the panel started to short circuit, so the lift was shut down for a full inspection. When an employee went to examine why it was malfunctioning, he discovered several buttons on the board were wet, the local newspaper Xiao Xiang Chen Bao reported.

If you’re wondering how dumb you have to be to pee on your own elevator buttons, well, it gets better: there was a security camera in the lift.

Caught in the act. Surveillance footage of the young culprit in action.
Photo: 163.com

Surveillance footage showed the boy, aged about 12 or 13, urinating on the panel after he entered the lift on the 15th floor.

“The boy was lucky he didn’t get an electric shock, or else the consequences would have been more serious,” said You Xiaoming, director of the building’s management office.

The management office is still looking for the boy, whom they said probably lived in the building.

“This kind of behaviour is dangerous,” You said. “We hope his parents can guide him in the right direction.”

We hope so, too. We all know boys sometimes have trouble with their aim, but this is ridiculous.

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