Metalcore band Bring Me The Horizon is inspired by everything but metal

Metalcore band Bring Me The Horizon is inspired by everything but metal

British metalcore band Bring Me The Horizon tell Melanie Leung how they're inspired by everything but metal

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Bring Me The Horizon are always looking for new influences to help them grow musically.
Bring Me The Horizon are always looking for new influences to help them grow musically.

Bring Me The Horizon seem to be one of those bands you either love or hate. Since their 2006 debut album, Count Your Blessings, they've been receiving polarised critical responses.

Three albums later, and with 2013's Sempiternal reaching number three on the UK Album Chart, we can safely say that the metalcore band has more lovers than haters. They're coming to Hong Kong this Friday to rock the Macpherson Stadium, and 27-year-old lead vocalist Oliver Sykes is clearly, well, psyched to be here for the first time.

"Actually, Hong Kong will be one of the first places to hear a brand new song," Sykes reveals to Young Post in a recent Skype chat while touring the USA.

Though he wouldn't say what the new song is, one possibility is Drown. The music video for the track was released on YouTube just last month. It's one of BMTH's more melodic songs and notably free of Sykes's forceful screaming.

The band formed in 2004 while still teenagers and a decade on, Sykes says they've grown a lot musically.

"We started out as kids, not knowing how to play our instruments or what to do, and slowly learned. Each album we pushed ourselves harder and tried new things," he says, hinting that fans should have high expectations for their new album, due out next year.

"I guess you could say we are a metal band that takes inspiration from everything but metal … Film scores, dance music, hip hop, pop, but it can start with anything. We wanted to exploit the best parts of other genres, to create something new." Hmm, even country? "Apart from country," laughs Sykes.

While their music evolves, the lyrics stay dark and deep. "Music is a very powerful outlet for emotion. With music you have to be honest or there's no point," says Sykes, who admits to having problems with drugs in the past. "For me, it's therapeutic. I get to spill my guts, then scream it as loud as I can - that's better than any therapy session."

Screaming too much has its toll, though. Sykes has to warm his voice up every day and avoid alcohol or late nights. "My voice is not like a guitar. If a string breaks, you can replace it."

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Screaming their way to success

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