Rapper J Hus shows the best of British grime on Common Sense [Review]

Rapper J Hus shows the best of British grime on Common Sense [Review]

British grime artist J Hus made his name uploading freestyles to the internet, before moving onto mixtapes. The 20-year-old has now released his debut album Common Sense.

British grime artist J Hus made his name uploading freestyles online, before moving onto mixtapes. The 20-year-old rapper has now released his debut album Common Sense.

It opens strongly with the title track: sharp lyrics are laid over a blend of 90s hip hop, fast trumpets, and sparkly strings. Next, J Hus calls upon early 00s R’n’B beats in Bouff Daddy.

Clartin is far more aggressive, featuring gunfire samples, while Leave Me gives J Hus space for emotional and honest lyrics.


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Close Doors and Good Luck Chale show jazz influences, while the closing tracks mix things up even further: Mash Up uses synth sounds, Who You Are includes a strong dub beat and Friendly has a dreamy feel. Goodies is the most urgent-sounding track, using samples to paint the rapper in a gangster light.

However, the middle section feels a little stale. Both Did You See and Plottin move in a dance-pop direction, but other tracks Like Your Style, Sweet Cheeks, Fisherman and Good Time all use a same-y blend of electro R’n’B and afrobeat.

Overall, J Hus has put together a strong lineup of catchy instrumentals and different moods, . For R’n’B or grime fans, it would be only common sense to add this record to their collection.

Contains strong language


 

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