Over to you

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From falling in love to finding inner strength, here are the moments that mattered to them.
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The wind creaked through the open window and sang me a bitter lullaby. I pulled my thin sheets tighter around me, attempting in vain to block out the icy chill in the air. The slim makeshift bed sheet did nothing to cushion me from the cool hard surface of the bathtub.
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As millennials, our cadets feel they are often misunderstood by the more traditional previous generation so here are their heartfelt words to their predecessors.
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As a lonely young writer struggles to deal with anxiety, the ocean becomes the one place where they find solace and inspiration.
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Each week, we ask Young Post readers to share a little bit about themselves along with a quote that helps them get through life
She will not have the luxury of a honeymoon period that most new office holders enjoy - and must dive headfirst into Hong Kong’s stale social and political problems.
Many teenagers are addicted to celebrities, such as musicians, actors, sports stars ... the list goes on. There are both pros and cons, but I’d like to discuss two disadvantages to this trend.
“To take the branch for the root” is one of those wonderful Chinese idioms that don’t translate quite well, but are applicable to many situations. Used to describe things done contrary to logical order, this idiom can indeed be applied to Hong Kong.
The chief executive-elect’s 'I am Chinese' campaign won't work because it does not address the root cause of HK's problems.
It’s become fashionable among commentators to mourn what they see as the end of the free trade consensus that has dominated economic thought and policy for decades.
Hate it when you can’t talk back? Well, you can with Young Post. Have your say and share with students around Hong Kong
Each week, two of our readers debate a hot topic in a parliamentary-style debate that doesn’t necessarily reflect their personal viewpoint. This week’s topic is ...
I can barely remember what it felt like in the months leading to the start of university. Was I nervous, excited, or relieved?
In a poll in 2016, only 32 per cent of Americans said that they have “a great deal” or “a fair amount” of trust in the mainstream media. The number is especially low among Republican voters, with only 14 per cent of them saying they trust the mainstream media.