Op-ed

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We’re rage junkies. It’s not enough to roll our eyes at a thing we don’t like. We have to find the thing and taunt it, tease it, torture it, like a bunch of bullies in a high school cafeteria
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Those who expected a political spectacle in the new Legislative Council were certainly not disappointed. The past few weeks have indeed been farcical.
The inescapable fact is that the futures of Hong Kong and China are inextricably linked – but maybe that isn’t as bad as recent flare-ups would have us believe.
United States is no doubt the world’s largest military force. In 2014, it spent US$580 billion on the military – twice as much as the combined figure for China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia.
Donald Trump confuses me. I admit he has charisma, judging by his eye-catching slogans and controversial comments, but I don’t think the US should choose this man as their commander-in-chief.
Back in August 2014, the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in the US by a police officer sparked civil unrest, leading to thousands of protesters taking to the streets.
Sometimes, we have to wonder whether we’re living in Hong Kong, the bustling hub of commerce and finance, or Hong Kong, the modern day slavery capital.
In my opinion, there are two types of innovation. There is true innovation, with the potential to advance societies, and there is innovation for it’s own sake, done as a claim for fame.
The government housing development in Wang Chau in Tuen Mun has attracted a lot of publicity following the election of legislator Eddie Chu Hoi-Dick.
Localism is gaining momentum in Hong Kong – as can be seen by the fact that there are now six localist candidates in the Legislative Council.
Crystal Fung Ying-ying was crowned Miss Hong Kong earlier this month and is already under fire for swearing on Facebook two years ago.