Listening & scripts

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Joanne and her parents went to Tokyo last week, and today she is talking to her friend Janet all about it.
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When you’ve got planned something and it doesn’t happen or work out for some reason you can say that it’s fallen through. Listen to the two conversations and then answer the questions. In the first, friends Jimmy and Marc meet up for a coffee.
When you’ve got planned something and it doesn’t happen or work out for some reason you can say that it’s fallen through. In the first, friends Jimmy and Marc meet up for a coffee.
Once a month, English teacher Ms Chan organises a “Show and Tell” for the school’s English Club. Last week, Tom brought something to talk about.
Once a month, English teacher Ms Chan organises a “Show and Tell” for the school’s English Club. Last week, Tom brought something to talk about.
Sometimes, the words in everyday English phrases are not used in their literal sense. For example, “Let’s call it a day!’ means “Let’s stop what we are doing. We’ve been doing it long enough!”
Sometimes, the words in everyday English phrases are not used in their literal sense. For example, “Let’s call it a day!’ means “Let’s stop what we are doing. We’ve been doing it long enough!”
Listen to this commentary from a short film about a colony of penguins facing extinction in Antarctica.
This commentary from a short film about a colony of penguins facing extinction in Antarctica.
As well as its literal meaning, ‘to get cold feet' means you are feeling a bit nervous or worried about something you have agreed or planned to do. Listen to true conversations Ben had recently with two of his friends, Donna and Maggie. Both of them have got cold feet about something. What are...
As well as its literal meaning, ‘to get cold feet' means you are feeling a bit nervous or worried about something you have agreed or planned to do. Donna and Maggie. Both of them have got cold feet about something. What are they nervous about?