How the students see it

How the students see it

The Student of the Year Awards are almost upon us. The most prestigious annual secondary school competition is judged by past winners, Hong Kong university professors, experts in the field and Sout

The Student of the Year Awards are almost upon us. The most prestigious annual secondary school competition is judged by past winners, Hong Kong university professors, experts in the field and South China Morning Post editors. We asked our junior reporters what they would look for if they were part of the judging panel. This is what they said…

Student of the Year - Grand Prize

First, I think the winner should have acquired remarkable academic results so that he/she stands out from tens of thousands of students in Hong Kong. He/she should also be well-rounded and have gained considerable achievements in one or more extracurricular activities.

Second, the winner must be polite, friendly and humble. As a role model to other students in Hong Kong, he/she must respect teachers and be supportive of friends and not look down on anyone because of their family background or academic results. He/she should be easygoing so that people would feel comfortable around him/her. He/she should be humble and be helpful to friends with their schoolwork.

Third, the winner should show determination to strive for success, and to feed on pressure. And he/she should not forget to give back to the community by volunteering regularly during weekends or holidays.

Ruby Leung, 16, Maryknoll Convent School
Ruby has been nominated for the Junior Reporter of the Year at the Young Post Junior Reporter Awards

Community Contributor Award

You should be determined to help others. Community contribution is a lifelong devotion even though there is no guaranteed pay-off in doing it.

You should show perseverance and never quit easily even if you've lost interest in it. What counts most in deciding a person's contribution is not only the time dedicated to achieving a goal, but also the impact that he or she makes on others.

Therefore, a community contributor should think from the perspective of the underprivileged to best attain the aim of community work: make Hong Kong a better place to live in for every individual. Some might think one's passion is the only important thing when achieving a goal. But to be considerate of other people goes far beyond just compassion; it is the quality needed most in community contribution. The winner, therefore, should see society as a whole and consider public interest the first priority when giving a helping hand to people in need.

Winnie Lee Wing-yee, 18, Community College of City University
Winnie received a Certificate of Secondary School award from the Community Youth Club for her charity work

Sportsperson of the Year

I expect to see determination and dedication from the Sportsperson of the Year winner.

As a field hockey player, I realise a sportsperson's life is not a bed of roses. Many times they have to deal with doubt, desperation and loneliness. Behind the glory and pride, they may sometimes feel nobody supports them or understands them. Determination gives the Sportsperson of the Year winner a strong foundation to dare to dream, and strive to succeed.

It is also essential for the winner to have a genuine passion for the sports they play. Enthusiasm drives people to give their full devotion, and put in 110 per cent effort during training. Sometimes they might complain about their tough schedule to their friends or teammates, but the love of sports is deeply rooted in their hearts, and will never go away.

I think a sportsperson's gratitude shows their true character. Success does not imply arrogance. A virtuous person counts their blessings and recognises there are things greater than they are in this world.

Minnie Yip Ming-yuen, 15, Diocesan Girls' School
Minnie is the captain of her school's hockey team and a member of the Hong Kong under-18 hockey team


You might also like:

- The Student of the Year Awards are almost upon us. We asked our junior reporters what they would look for if they were part of the judging panel

- Prof Cheng Kai-ming of HKU and Dr Kim Mak of the Hong Kong Jockey Club talk about the qualities necessary for this year’s winners in the Linguist and Community Contributor categories

- Tiso Ho of Hong Kong Arts Festival and Prof Chung Pak-kwong of Baptist University reveals what they feel are needed qualities for this year’s winners

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