Top movies of brotherhood

Top movies of brotherhood

Bromances can make for great viewing. Here are some examples where guys are at their best

Is it just me or is there a lack of good bromances out there? Ask me about sisterhoods and I can name quite a few. Most good bromances seem to be on TV, like those in Supernatural.

But as far as the big screen is concerned, I'll have to go with Maverick and Goose from Top Gun. The tense drama about fighter jet pilots has some good comic moments. Reckless Maverick and cautious Goose are made for each other. So fly away to the danger zone.

Susan Ramsay


Photo: Melinda Sue Gordon

The Hangover and The Hangover Part II are my top choices for movies about brotherhood. The chaps in them mess up pretty badly - first in Las Vegas, then in Bangkok. In both movies, the pack loses a member of the gang and needs to track him down. But no matter how bad the situation is - whether they get beaten up or are being chased by gangsters - they refuse to give up. They stick together until they are all reunited. The movies are popular as comedies, but I also see them as stories about true friendship.

Wong Yat-hei

When it comes to bromance, my choice is a movie about American football. Remember the Titans is a fine example of the healing power of sport. In a racially-segregated southern US high school, black and white players and coaches first come to blows. But ultimately they manage to put their differences aside to fight for what they all believe in: sporting glory.

There's nothing like throwing a ball around to heal rifts.

Karly Cox

Brothers don't necessarily have to be biologically so. Take Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan in the Rush Hour series. One comes from the mean streets of Los Angeles while the other is from the streets of Hong Kong.

In the beginning, it seems, they are at odds because of their background and cultural differences. But once they put those differences aside to solve a crime, they become an unstoppable team. They stand and fight shoulder to shoulder, displaying some great martial acrobatics and even greater comedic banter.

And if that wasn't enough, they discover their shared love of some funky pop tunes.

Leon Lee

The brotherhood in Legends of the Fall has left me with a long-lasting impression. Directed by Edward Zwick, the 1994 movie is a tale of love and betrayal - and finally forgiveness - among the three sons of Colonel Ludlow (Anthony Hopkins).

The tale is set in the wilds of Montana in the early 1900s. The three brothers - Alfred (Aidan Quinn), Tristan (Brad Pitt) and Samuel (Henry Thomas) - have an unbreakable bond. Until, that is, a woman named Susannah (Julia Ormond), Samuel's fiancee, enters their lives.

The ensuing love triangle makes for a moving story. Tristan goes to the first world war in Europe to protect his younger brother who is fighting in the frontlines. In a heartbreaking scene, Tristan sees Samuel falling prey to enemy soldiers as he watches helplessly.

The film depicts emotions of brotherly love, and sometimes hatred, in a delicate way.

Mabel Sieh

Superbad is the movie which kick-started Jonas Hill's career as a natural-born comedian. It also cemented Michael Cera in the role of awkward teenager in seemingly every coming-of-age movie since.

This heartfelt comedy may contain swearing and adult themes, but the friendship between these two unpopular high school seniors, Seth (Hill) and Evan (Cera), is truly fun to watch.

Despite some mean bullies, the two stick together as they help each other find their first love.

Not surprisingly, their friendship faces challenges when girls are brought into the bromance formula. The best buds also have to deal with their first separation since childhood because they are going to different colleges.

This movie makes me think of Lockie, my best high school mate. Too bad, he has never even existed. Lockie, where are you? It's super-bad you've never been there for me.

Chris Lau

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