Committing to a green future

Committing to a green future

YP junior reporters learn from the experts how young people must take responsibility for the planet

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Clockwise from top: Sophie Cheung, Ruby Leung, Gio Ambrocio, Robert Swan, primary school students give a 'green' performance, Swan's message, Florence Too, Janet Tam and Betty Hung. Photos: Maggie Chen, Florence Too, Sophie Cheung.
Clockwise from top: Sophie Cheung, Ruby Leung, Gio Ambrocio, Robert Swan, primary school students give a 'green' performance, Swan's message, Florence Too, Janet Tam and Betty Hung. Photos: Maggie Chen, Florence Too, Sophie Cheung.
Photos: SCMP
On November 7, Young Post junior reporters attended the Get It Green Youth Summit. The event, co-organised by Civic Exchange and the Environmental Campaign Committee, featured a keynote address by Robert Swan, the first person to walk to both the North and South Poles. Here are some of our reporters' thoughts.

Ruby Leung

Many people don't really understand climate change - I've got to admit, I'm one of them. That's why I wanted to go to Get It Green.

Robert Swan told us about his trips to the North and South Poles. He finished by saying: 'The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.' We are all responsible for the damage to the earth and should work to fix it.

Dr Lee Tsz-cheung, senior scientific officer of the Hong Kong Observatory, said: 'Humans have had free meals for long enough. It's time to face the consequences.' He was referring to how we have used natural resources for so long and how it's time to stop wasting them.

Natalli Wan

Robert Swan shared his experience of walking 1,450 kilometres to the South Pole. He also set up an organisation dedicated to preserving Antarctica and promoting renewable energy.

He proved the importance of not giving up - for example, when his team's ship sank on the way to the South Pole, he kept going.

Karen Lee Ka-ki

Many Hongkongers don't realise the need to protect the natural environment, such as our countryside and wetlands. It is time for us to engage on climate issues and reduce our carbon footprint.

If all of us do little things, like reducing and recycling, we can achieve a lot. Never give up promoting green awareness. I believe our earth can have a green future.

Florence Too Sin-yu

Robert Swan kindled my passion for environmental protection.

As a teenager, I feel I have an obligation to help the world because the future is in our hands. We should learn more about the environment and use our knowledge to influence others and save the planet together. I also hope the world's leaders can together make changes.

Our beautiful planet gives us plenty of resources. We have destroyed its beauty to fulfil our desires but we can choose to change. When we buy something to eat, we shouldn't just be concerned about how much it costs. We also have to think about environmental costs - how much in terms of resources was required to produce the food.

Sophie Cheung

Robert Swan left the biggest impression on me. After watching a film on the Antarctic when he was 11, he said, he was inspired to walk to the Poles. It took him seven years - working as a taxi driver and asking people to sponsor him - to raise enough money. His determination and commitment were moving.

He told us to remember 2041 - that's when a treaty to protect Antarctica expires. He said it was our generation's job to keep the only pure place left on earth uncontaminated. In 2041, I will surely take action to protect that continent.

Janet Tam Ka-wing

It was a pleasure to participate in Get It Green. Robert Swan's speech was really interesting and informative. The thing which impressed me very much was when he said: 'The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.'

After the talk, I understood that everyone on earth has a responsibility to protect it.

Betty Hung Nga-yan

Everyone has dreams, big and small. Robert Swan shared his big dream with us, and how he fulfilled it.

On his journey to the South Pole, he obtained first-hand experience of the thinning of the ozone layer, when sunlight reflected by the snow damaged his skin and eyes. He also showed us photos of how people have polluted the Poles and the effect of human activity on animals. This helped us understand how people harm the earth.

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