Script: Listening Exercise 74

Script: Listening Exercise 74

Content Creator
John Millen used to teach English and French in a secondary school in the UK. He believes telling others about a good book is a brilliant thing to do.
A TERRIBLE JOURNEY HOME

Sam works for a big banking corporation and occasionally he has to travel out of town to see an important client. Kate, his wife, knows he has not been in the office today and Sam has told her that he would not be home at the usual time after work tonight. But when it gets late and Kate hasn’t heard from her husband, she starts to get worried. Sam eventually arrives home much to Kate’s relief. Listen to the conversation between Sam and Kate and answer the questions.

Kate: Thank goodness you’re home. I’ve been worried sick!

Sam: I’ve just had the most terrible journey home. A nightmare!

Kate: Why didn’t you call me? I’ve been ringing your mobile since seven o’clock and it just kept going straight to voicemail.

Sam: The battery was dead. I forgot to charge it this morning as I usually do and didn’t think I’d need my phone tonight. I thought I’d be home by seven.

Kate: What happened?

Sam: I had to go and see a client this afternoon. He’s on an industrial estate up in Shengzhen.

Kate: You told me last night.

Sam: Well, no problems getting there and the day went well. I left about four o’clock.

Kate: That's pretty early?

Sam: Yes. We got through what we had to do fairly quickly and the director’s secretary phoned a taxi to take me to the train station.

Kate: So far so good.

Sam: We’d been driving about ten minutes when there was a loud bang. A puncture! He was driving slowly and managed to pull up safely at the side of the road.

Kate: What did you do?

Sam: The driver said it would take ten minutes to change the wheel so I got out and stood by the car. I even offered to help but he said it was okay and he knew what he was doing. A couple of other cars even stopped to offer help but the driver said he was okay.

Kate: Did he get it done quickly?

Sam: It took him fifty-five minutes to change the wheel. I tried not to lose my patience with him because the guy was under stress. But I was really fed up by the time we got going again.

Kate: But you got to the station okay?

Sam: Eventually. But rush hour had started and the station was packed. The first train arrived and only a few people got on because it was full. Another two trains went by full and then I got the next one.

Kate: But it’s only a half hour journey isn’t it?

Sam: It should have been. We’d been going about ten minutes when the train suddenly stopped. Nothing. No announcements. Nothing. Then the train driver announced that there was a signal failure and we couldn’t move until it was sorted out. We were stuck there for an hour and a half. Can you believe it? An hour and a half!

Kate: Poor you!

Sam: But the best is yet to come. I got the bus to come back here. No problems there, I thought. It wasn’t busy. There was only a handful of passengers. Home

soon! But I was so wrong.

Kate: Oh, no. Go on.

Sam: Not much traffic either. But suddenly the bus swerved and knocked into a motorbike. We mounted the pavement. I thought the poor motorcyclist had had it.

Kate: Was he okay?

Sam: The ambulance and police arrived quickly there and the poor guy was badly injured. So was the bus driver. He’d flown through the front window. There was blood all over the place.

Kate: Were you okay?

Sam: Oh, yes. But the police had to interview everyone who’d been on the bus. That took ages. I just want to lie down on the sofa. Any chance of a cup of tea to calm my nerves?

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