Little Nightmares lives up to its name [Review]

Little Nightmares lives up to its name [Review]

The horror of being small and weak compared to something monstrous and terrifying is real, and when fighting back isn't an option, the only thing you can do is run

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The characters are often hooded and disfigured, like they might be in a nightmare.

Little Nightmares is a short horror game available to play on PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Released in April, this dark tale will confront players with their childhood fears as they play as a little girl called Six, who is trying to escape from a mysterious and super creepy vessel called the Maw.

The graphics are stunning - the cartoon-ish, raincoat-clad Six looks puny when compared to the creatures she has to overcome. The game is played from Six's perspective, and the differences in size help players sympathise with Six's plight.

The whole game has a nightmarish vibe to it. The characters are often hooded and disfigured, like they might be in a nightmare. There's a constant feeling of dread throughout, brought to life by the creepy sound effects; the silences are deafening, the creaks and cracks are terrifying, and you're never quite sure what might be behind Six, or just around the corner.


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Each room has its own sinister tone, and the different scenarios presented really keep players on their toes. Dying in-game happens often, demonstrating just how dangerous the Maw is.

Players have to explore the Maw through a range of puzzles, and you have to put together various clues before you can begin to understand the backstory.

Little Nightmares really lives up to its name - the horror of being small and weak compared to something monstrous and terrifying is real, and when fighting back isn't an option, the only thing you can do is run. That feeling is perfectly captured by the breathless chases conducted between Six and her enemies.

This is a very short game, but tensions are kept high throughout, and players are left with the taste of their fear lingering at the back of their throats when they put down the controls.

This article appeared in the Young Post print edition as
Little Nightmares

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